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Bennett White
Bennett White

Best Quality Tvs To Buy


Serious gamers also need to check that their prospective new TV supports all of the latest gaming features. The most technically advanced and therefore rarest of these is 4K/120Hz, but VRR and ALLM are also worth looking out for. There are a number of TVs on this list that support all of these features, but we have a dedicated best gaming TVs guide for those to whom gaming is the primary concern.




best quality tvs to buy



Overall, the C2 is quite comfortably the best TV available at the size, particularly if you combine it with a soundbar. But do stay tuned for our review of the new C3, which is expected to arrive in shops very soon.


We don't accept the out-of-the-box settings that a TV comes in either. While we intentionally don't go down the route of professional calibration (you shouldn't have to have your TV professionally calibrated in order to get the best out of it), we do spend hours adjusting settings using a mixture of test patterns and real-world content until we are sure we're getting the most out of a TV so that it has the best chance to shine.


From all of our reviews, we choose the best products to feature in our Best Buys. That's why if you take the plunge and buy one of the products recommended above, or on any other Best Buy page, you can be assured you are getting a What Hi-Fi? approved product.


The Hisense U8H is the follow-up to one of our favorite TVs from 2021, the Hisense U8G, and stands alongside the TCL 6-Series as one of the best values. It's reasonably priced (especially if you can find it for its "everyday" price, rather than its higher suggested retail price), plus it offers loads of features and a fantastic picture. It shows more light bloom than the Samsung QN90B (and obviously more than any OLED TV), but its bright panel, wide colors, and Google TV platform with hands-free Google Assistant make it an excellent deal.


This is a bit pricier than a budget TV, but not by much. If you're willing to spend around $1,000, this is one of the best choices available. The TCL Google TV 6-Series is almost identical in features and performance, though it isn't quite as bright.


This is the best-looking TV we've seen yet and is a stunning showcase for the capabilities of OLED panels. Its color performance is close to perfect and it offers effectively infinite contrast thanks to its perfect black levels. It's also quite reasonably priced for an OLED. LG's WebOS interface is occasionally clunky, but it's loaded with features like hands-free voice assistants and Apple AirPlay 2. It's simply an incredible all-around package.


If you're willing to splurge for a TV (around $2,500 for the 65-inch model), the C2 should be at the top of your list. It offers something for everyone, beyond its stellar picture quality. Gamers, in particular, should appreciate its low input lag, as well as both its AMD FreeSync Premium and Nvidia G-Sync Compatible features.


If you want a big, premium TV, the Samsung S95C offers class-leading picture quality. It's a technological marvel that's best for big spenders with spacious living rooms. For the rest of us, the OLED LG C2 remains a top alternative.


This is another strong value option because it strikes an ideal balance between picture quality and price, much like the Hisense U8H. Other cheaper models aren't as likely to impress. Whether you should buy the TCL or Hisense model depends on your design tastes and whether you can find either model on sale.


Hisense and TCL have both proven that you can get excellent picture quality and plenty of features out of a modestly priced TV (generally in the $1,000 to $1,300 range for 65-inch models). Below that price range, you need to make some compromises, but not too many. The Hisense U6H's contrast levels aren't impressive, for instance, but its color performance is fantastic and it offers tons of useful features including Apple AirPlay, Google Cast, and hands-free Google Assistant. This TV is also frequently available for below its suggested retail price, which helps solidify it as one of the best budget-priced TVs we've seen yet.


Outdoor TVs are few and far between, and you can count on spending a fair amount for them. The rock-solid build quality of these models, which ensures that they can survive extreme temperatures along with rain, snow, and dirt, tends to be the reason for the extra cost. This doesn't mean you have to compromise on picture quality, though, and that's where the SunBriteTV Veranda 3 excels. Its color range and accuracy are excellent and, although the TV is designed for use in full shade, it does a solid job of reducing glare.


If you want a TV for your (covered) deck or patio, and don't mind spending the money for the best picture for that purpose, the SunBriteTV Veranda 3 is the ideal pick. We've seen a few more affordable outdoor TVs, but none look nearly as good or offer as many smart TV features.


This is the best Fire TV option on the list, though that isn't saying much. Otherwise, its low price makes it a good choice for people who want to add an Alexa-centric TV to their home without spending a ton of money.


For pure picture quality and value, the LG C2 is by far our top OLED pick because of its nearly perfect colors that don't require a contrast-compromising quantum dot layer. However, the A95K has a few advantages that make it a worthwhile choice for high-end home theaters. This is one of the very few TVs that has spring clips for speaker wires, letting you connect it to your A/V receiver to function as the center-channel speaker, taking full advantage of the crisp, clean sound from the actuators to bring out dialog while letting you keep your favorite amp-driven stereo or satellite speakers. That's a pretty big boon for a custom installation.


You should consider this TV if you want very good picture quality and an easy-to-use interface. The Roku TV platform has gone through many back-end upgrades over the years, but the app-based user experience remains as simple as ever. AirPlay compatibility also makes it appealing for iPhone users.


Moreover, there's no consumer-ready 8K media available, and no major studios or distributors have even talked about releasing 8K movies or shows so far. There aren't yet physical or streaming media standards that allow 8K video to be commercially released. Even if you can find an 8K TV, at best you might be able to watch upconverted 4K video on it. So, for the time being, don't worry about 8K suddenly replacing 4K. It won't happen anytime soon.


Performance among budget TVs varies wildly and trends toward the mediocre. You might find a few very good deals, like the TCL 6-series and Hisense U7G series, that manage to combine excellent picture quality with a reasonable price. You are also likely to find a sea of cheap TVs that don't measure up in one way or another.


A big TV that's too close can be just as uncomfortable to watch as a small one that's too far away, so don't assume that the biggest screen available is the best choice. There are a few different rules of thumb regarding TV screen size based on your distance from it.


Contrast ratio, meanwhile, is the difference between the darkest black and the brightest white a panel can display. In theory, the highest contrast ratio possible is desirable since dark blacks and bright whites contribute to a high-quality picture. There isn't really a standardized way for manufacturers to measure this spec, though, and vendors are all vying to come up with the highest ratios so their TVs seem more appealing. Previously, OLED TVs were the only models we've tested to actually produce an "infinite" contrast ratio with a perfect 0 black level, but recently mini LED backlight systems have enabled some TVs, like Samsung's flagship LED models, to also offer perfect black levels with no noticeable light bloom. We measure contrast ratios with a consistent process across all TVs, so you can trust our numbers.


Your ideal TV should provide enough video connections not only for now but also for the foreseeable future. The most important input is HDMI, which supports all major forms of digital video sources including Blu-ray players, game consoles, set-top boxes, and PCs through a single cable. Most TVs have three or four HDMI ports, but some might only have two. If you want a 4K screen, make sure the HDMI ports are at least HDMI 2.0. It's the current standard and supports 4K video at 60 frames per second; older HDMI ports can only handle 4K up to 30 frames per second, at best. HDMI 2.1, meanwhile, supports higher resolutions and faster refresh rates, though it isn't vital for most content currently available.


As for cables, unless you have a huge home theater system and plan to run cables between devices at distances longer than 25 feet (and that's being generous), brands and prices don't matter. We've compared the performance of high-end cables and inexpensive ones, and found that they all carry digital signals similarly. More expensive cables might have a better build quality, but you won't see any performance advantages from them. Don't shop for HDMI cables at retail stores, and ignore any clerks who warn you of "dirty electricity" or "viruses" that can come with cheap cables (both claims I've witnessed). Hop online and find the least expensive cable at the size you need and snap it up.


HDMI also supports the highest-end home theater audio standards, though you'll generally have to give up a port as a video input to use it. Most TVs have an HDMI port with an audio return channel (ARC), clearly labeled on the back. ARC enables sound to be sent downstream to a connected soundbar or speaker system from the TV over HDMI and supports compressed 5.1-channel surround sound like optical connections do. However, recent TVs have enhanced ARC, or eARC, which offers even higher-quality audio and more features than optical or ARC can provide. eARC supports uncompressed multi-channel sound, including spatial audio like Dolby Atmos and DTS:X. In fact, if you want to use those much more precise surround systems instead of discrete channel feeds, you need to use eARC. 041b061a72


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