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Amores Perros



Amores perros is a 2000 Mexican psychological drama film directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu (in his feature directorial debut) and written by Guillermo Arriaga, based on a story by them both. Amores perros is the first installment in González Iñárritu's "Trilogy of Death", succeeded by 21 Grams and Babel.[4] It makes use of the multi-narrative hyperlink cinema style and features an ensemble cast. The film is constructed as a triptych: it contains three distinct stories connected by a car crash in Mexico City. The stories centre on a teenager in the slums who gets involved in dogfighting; a model who seriously injures her leg; and a mysterious hitman. The stories are linked in various ways, including the presence of dogs in each of them.




Amores Perros


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The title is a pun in Spanish; the word "perros", which literally means "dogs", can also be used to refer to misery, so that it roughly means 'bad loves' with canine connotations. The film was released under its Spanish title in the English-speaking world, although it was sometimes translated as Love's a Bitch in marketing. The soundtrack includes songs by Latin American rock bands including Café Tacuba, Control Machete, and Bersuit Vergarabat.


Amores perros premiered on May 14, 2000 at the 2000 Cannes Film Festival and went on a Mexican release on June 16, 2000.[5] Amores perros was a Mexican commercial and critical success and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 2000 and won the Ariel Award for Best Picture from the Mexican Academy of Film. Amores perros has been considered one of the best Mexican films by many. Filmmaker Denis Villeneuve praised Amores perros as one of the best films of the 21st century.[6]


The three overlapping stories all take place in Mexico City, but because of class division, there is severe segregation of economic classes with El Chivo squatting on the outskirts of town, Octavio living in a working-class neighborhood, and Valeria living in a luxurious high-rise apartment.[12] If not for the car crash, these three characters would never interact. The upper class is victimized in Amores perros even when they are the ones perpetuating crime. For instance, El Chivo is hired to kill a man's business partner and eventually decides to leave both men to fight it out themselves. Although Ramiro works at a grocery store, he also participates in the underground economy by committing robberies. Octavio and El Chivo participate in the underground economy as well, in order to secure untaxed income and bring stability to their lives.[13]


Amores perros contains domestic violence, gun violence, and animal cruelty.[14] The domestic violence is evident in the relationship between Ramiro and his wife, Susana, when Ramiro beats his younger brother Octavio with a metal rod while Octavio takes a shower, as well as in Valeria and Daniel's relationship as they both begin to become verbally and physically aggressive after Valeria becomes depressed. Gun violence is seen from the beginning of the film in a frantic car chase until the very end when El Chivo hands the gun to the two business partners, leaving them to fight their own battle. Lastly, animal cruelty is quite visible in the dog fights Octavio attends in order to make money off of his dog, Cofi. The dog owners show no empathy toward their dogs.


The DVD of Amores perros has a commentary track, by the director and the screenplay writer. A controversial aspect of the film is the dog fighting sequences. González Iñárritu explains that no dogs were harmed during the making of Amores perros. In the scenes where dogs are apparently attacking each other, they were actually playing. Their muzzles were covered with fine fishing line, so that they were unable to bite another dog. In the shots where dogs are apparently dead or dying, they were sedated (under supervision of the Mexican SPCA). The grittiness of the scenes is amplified by quick cuts and sound effects. Another unusual aspect of the production of Amores perros was the danger to the cast and film crew while filming in the poor parts of Mexico City. The director and some of the crew were actually robbed by street gangs.The Director cut includes a cameo from the veteran Japanese singer Kazuyo Togawa singing A cappella, credited as "Fat Lady".


Amores perros drew widespread attention to and condemnation of the practice of dog fighting in Mexico.[18] Lead actress Vanessa Bauche has supported animal advocates' anti-dogfighting campaign.[19] Dog fighting was finally outlawed in Mexico on 24 June 2017.[20]


Octavio, que está enamorado de Susana y quiere irse lejos con ella y con su hijo, decide conseguir dinero apostando con su perro, el Cofi. Tras una sugerencia de su amigo, Octavio va a visitar al dueño del tugurio en donde se hacen las peleas. Aunque al principio se muestra renuente, tras una pequeña pelea de demostración el dueño acepta darle una oportunidad a Octavio y al Cofi. Ambos se alían, de forma que Octavio pone el perro y el dueño las apuestas. Octavio logra una buena fortuna, derrotando en repetidas ocasiones a los perros del Jarocho.


Amores perros è un film del 2000 diretto da Alejandro González Iñárritu. È il primo capitolo della Trilogia sulla morte, seguito da 21 grammi e Babel. Il film ha ricevuto una candidatura ai Premi Oscar 2001 come miglior film straniero ed è detentore di oltre 50 premi cinematografici.


Amores perros is a 2000 Mexican drama thriller film directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu and written by Guillermo Arriaga. Amores perros is the first installment in González Iñárritu's "Trilogy of Death", succeeded by 21 Grams and Babel.[4] It is an anthology film constructed as a triptych: it contains three distinct stories connected by a car accident in Mexico City. The stories centre on a teenager in the slums who gets involved in dogfighting; a model who seriously injures her leg; and a mysterious hitman. The stories are linked in various ways, including the presence of dogs in each of them.The title is a pun in Spanish; the word "perros", which literally means "dogs", can also be used to refer to misery, so that it roughly means 'bad loves' with canine connotations. The film was released under its Spanish title in the English-speaking world, although it was sometimes translated as Love's a Bitch in marketing.


  • Bayside resident Mark Metcalf is an actor who has worked in movies, TV and on the stage. He is best known for his work in "Animal House," "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Seinfeld."In addition to his work on screen, Metcalf is involved with Milwaukee Film, First Stage Children's Theater and a number of other projects, including comicwonder.com. He recently filmed an episode of the popular AMC series "Mad Men."He also finds time to write about movies for OnMilwaukee.com. This week, Metcalf weighs in on a pair of movies, "Amores Perros" and "Spun."AMORES PERROS (2000)"Love's a bitch." That is the translation of the title of this film by Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu. "What's love got to do with it?" is a lyric from a Tina Turner song and an apt response to Amores Perros. Certainly not "love" as it is understood in the movie language of the romantic United States.Amores Perros is a great film. It precedes by a few years, and I am sure inspired, the Paul Haggis film "Crash," which won a couple of Academy Awards, awards which should have gone to "Children of Men," another superior film also directed by a Mexican director. The storytelling technique goes back to Robert Altman's "Nashville." In the Altman film, many characters approach an event, a moment in time, from different directions, with different stories, each intertwined with the other in an accidental, peripheral way, sometimes merely by geography. googletag.cmd.push(function() googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1597166322662-mid-article-1'); ); I suppose that way of telling a larger story goes back to Chaucer in some way. There was a wonderful film several years ago called "Nine Lives," in which the stories of nine different women were told in nine short films. Each story was connected to the other in the briefest of ways but the whole accumulated into a strong and beautiful statement about relationships and the constant struggle to maintain them, and the impossibility of doing so unscarred.In Altman's film, everything moves forward toward a single event in the future, so there is the tradition of linear thinking as it relates to time. With Inarritu's film the action of the entire film spirals in time and space around a single event that happens early in the film and then continues to happen again and again as we experience that event from the perspective of several different characters as they are affected by it either directly or indirectly. The effect is one of putting a puzzle together. We are carried along by the tension of not knowing what is going on or what is going to happen and we are rewarded periodically as a piece will fall into place, or as two different stories will interconnect. The final act of what amounts to three acts concerns a street person, a man whose has left his family and his job to become a revolutionary, to change the world, one would think for the better. If you look around you'll notice that the changing the world thing hasn't worked out for any of us. This man, El Chivo, reduced to living on the street with his six dogs, has taken to committing assassinations for the local police when they need someone killed. He doesn't like it, but his remorse at the state of mankind and the chaos he has made of this world allows him to elevate himself to a god-like position where taking a human life is almost an act of vengeance of a wrathful god, or a sacrifice to a distant god.There is a wonderful line in the film, "If you want to make God laugh... tell him your plans."The hand-held, constantly moving camera, grainy film stock, and the remarkable verisimilitude of the performances give "Amores Perros" a fine edge of reality, cheap, violent and pathetic as it may be. It is really a brilliant film and shouldn't be missed by anyone interested in film and in the world beyond the gated community that we seem to live in. SPUN (2002)One of the purposes of any art form is to give the audience a feeling of existing in a particular place and time. "Spun" puts you right inside a methamphetamine addict's head and lets you ride that roller coaster for 90 minutes. googletag.cmd.push(function() googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1597166322662-mid-article-2'); ); It's the editing that gets you there. Editing and music, and the sense that someone has been down this herky-jerky road before and knows whereof they speak.There are outrageous performances from actors like John Leguizamo and Brittany Murphy. You expect it from Leguizamo, but Murphy is a complete surprise if you only know her from the Disney Channel. Mickey Rourke gives a very lived-in performance as The Cook, leading me to reevaluate his performance in "The Wrestler." It is a narrow band of existence that he is able to present in his performances, but he has great depth within the band.Jason Schwartzman, who is ordinarily so laid back that objects seem to pass right through him, is very energized under the influence of speed, but he still manages to maintain the passive aggressive cloak of invisibility that is his niche in the acting world.Much of the film feels like the great sequence in "Goodfellas" when Ray Liotta is over the edge of paranoia and energy from living in the cocaine closet and has to leave the house to make a delivery. The editing and sound have that kind of kinetic drive. But, it is hard to make it last for the entire film and, wisely, they don't try. The rhythm of the ups and downs, the high and then the crash of a life of addiction is well-paced throughout. More stories on: mark metcalf, amores perros, alejandro gonzalez Inarritu, spun, brittany murphy, mickey rourke, jason schwartzman Share with someone you care about:

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